Alan's film log

it’s funny how the colours of the real world only seem really real when you viddy them on a screen.

Canadian Group Delivering Water to Detroit to Protest Shutoffs

markruffalo:

This is kind of embarrassing. You have American’s who can’t find the heart to help these people so now we have the Canadians coming to the rescue. We are thrilled to spend trillions of dollars in war in other countries to “Help Them” but can’t find the heart to put these people on a payment plan they can afford. “Values”?

cinephiliabeyond:

On the set of his early short film, From the Drain  (1967), director David Cronenberg films Stefan Nosko, with the assistance of Sound Recordist Margaret Hindson, courtesy of David Cronenberg: Virtual Exhibition.

You’d expect a bit of strangeness from David Cronenberg‘s student films, but for most of its short length, From the Drain, which he made in 1967 while attending the University of Toronto, seems to deliver strangeness of an unexpected kind. Playing more like Waiting for Godot than his later vivid-to-the point of harrowing pictures like Crash, Videodrome, or The Fly, this thirteen-minute black-and-white film, only Cronenberg’s second, presents us with two fellows seated, fully clothed, in a bathtub. The situation looks bizarre, and as soon as the players start talking, it reveals itself as even more bizarre than we’d thought: evidently, one of these men has mistaken the tub for “the Disabled War Veterans’ Recreation Center.” The conversation continues without its participants leaving their porcelain confines, making a certain kind of sense on the surface but none at all beneath. This feels almost like the realm of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, which wouldn’t debut and begin exerting its vast influence on young comedic filmmakers until 1969. —From the Drain: a creepy comedy David Cronenberg made in film school


If you are a fan of David Cronenberg, then I would absolutely recommend checking Long Live the New Flesh: The Films of David Cronenberg  (1986), Videodrome: Forging the New Flesh  (2004), and David Cronenberg and the Cinema of the Extreme  (BBC, 1997).



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cinephiliabeyond:

On the set of his early short film, From the Drain  (1967), director David Cronenberg films Stefan Nosko, with the assistance of Sound Recordist Margaret Hindson, courtesy of David Cronenberg: Virtual Exhibition.

You’d expect a bit of strangeness from David Cronenberg‘s student films, but for most of its short length, From the Drain, which he made in 1967 while attending the University of Toronto, seems to deliver strangeness of an unexpected kind. Playing more like Waiting for Godot than his later vivid-to-the point of harrowing pictures like Crash, Videodrome, or The Fly, this thirteen-minute black-and-white film, only Cronenberg’s second, presents us with two fellows seated, fully clothed, in a bathtub. The situation looks bizarre, and as soon as the players start talking, it reveals itself as even more bizarre than we’d thought: evidently, one of these men has mistaken the tub for “the Disabled War Veterans’ Recreation Center.” The conversation continues without its participants leaving their porcelain confines, making a certain kind of sense on the surface but none at all beneath. This feels almost like the realm of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, which wouldn’t debut and begin exerting its vast influence on young comedic filmmakers until 1969. —From the Drain: a creepy comedy David Cronenberg made in film school

If you are a fan of David Cronenberg, then I would absolutely recommend checking Long Live the New Flesh: The Films of David Cronenberg  (1986), Videodrome: Forging the New Flesh  (2004), and David Cronenberg and the Cinema of the Extreme  (BBC, 1997).

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

message from the sound department

Organising the audio from ‘Autumn Leaves’ and Ive just realised something. NOT A SINGLE END SLATE MISSED.

We only did like 3 of them BUT I’M TAKING THAT AS A VICTORY FOR SYNC.

10 of my most hated things to hear on low/no budget films.

alansfilmlog:

Here’s a top ten of my most hated things to hear on low/no budget film sets. I’ve heard all these more than a couple of times now, luckily not by those I regularly work with but I’ve included what is said each time by my INNER VOICE and how this sometimes differs from what is said by my ACTUAL…

been reminded of some of these recently so thought i’d reblog myself.

doing some tests …………….. noiring it up to the max!

doing some tests …………….. noiring it up to the max!

morgansmovies:

As Edgar Wright leaves the directors chair on Marvel’s upcoming Ant-Man film, is this a secret message of support from Joss Whedon?
Creative differences were cited as the reason for Wright’s departure but given the depth and involvement that he had in this film, something doesn’t add up.
Perhaps Whedon knows a different, real, reason. I doubt we will ever know.

morgansmovies:

As Edgar Wright leaves the directors chair on Marvel’s upcoming Ant-Man film, is this a secret message of support from Joss Whedon?

Creative differences were cited as the reason for Wright’s departure but given the depth and involvement that he had in this film, something doesn’t add up.

Perhaps Whedon knows a different, real, reason. I doubt we will ever know.

the world is yours!

RIP

H.R. Giger

REST (short film)

added a page to my tumblr with my short film REST.

me by the uber talented Anna Crolla

me by the uber talented Anna Crolla

me on the set of Andy Stewart’s INK by Erin McGill

me on the set of Andy Stewart’s INK by Erin McGill